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Commentary Article - (2022) Volume 16, Issue 7

Impacts of fishing management on target species.

Obinna Musa*
 
Department of Microbiology, University of Nigeria, Nigeria
 
*Correspondence: Obinna Musa, Department of Microbiology, University of Nigeria, Nigeria, Email:

Received: 01-Jul-2022, Manuscript No. ipfs-22-11598; Editor assigned: 04-Jul-2022, Pre QC No. ipfs-22-11598 (PQ); Reviewed: 19-Jul-2022, QC No. ipfs-22-11598; Revised: 23-Jul-2022, Manuscript No. ipfs-22-11598 (R); Published: 30-Jul-2022, DOI: 10.36648/1307- 234X.22.16.100

Abstract

The design, operation, and performance of fisheries management systems around the world vary widely. There is diversity in management institutions, strategies, and tactics across different geographies, fishing fleets, and taxonomic groups. It is uncertain which individual management elements have the greatest influence on the status of fished populations, as well as which external factors influence the overall success of fisheries management systems, on a global scale. We employed expert surveys to characterise the management systems of 28 major fishing nations based on species, and we investigated the influence of economic, geographic, and fishery-related factors [1]. Science-based catch or effort restrictions are vital for successful fisheries management, and monetary investment in fisheries can benefit management objectives when used to control fishing pressure rather than increase fishing capacity. Countries with less effective management systems today have the greatest opportunity to enhance long-term stock status outcomes and should be the focus of global efforts to improve fisheries management.

Introduction

Recent research has yielded a variety of opinions on the status of marine populations, as well as recommendations for how the world's fisheries should be managed. Although scientists agree that stronger management is required, some proposed solutions include widespread establishment of marine reserves, whereas others involve greater investment in management structures, such as stock assessments and implementing catch or effort limits, or reforming fishing fleets to a rights-based management approach [2]. We used expert surveys to assess components of fisheries management systems such as research, management, enforcement, and socioeconomics in 28 major fishing countries that account for more than 80% of total catch globally [3]. We developed survey criteria to see if these qualities help to reduce fishing pressure on target species. Countries with less effective management systems today have the greatest opportunity to enhance long-term stock status outcomes and should be the focus of global efforts to improve fisheries management. Recent research have yielded a variety of opinions on the status of marine populations, as well as recommendations for how the world's fisheries should be managed.

Although scientists generally agree that stronger management is required, some proposed solutions include widespread establishment of marine reserves, whereas others involve greater investment in management structures, such as stock assessments and a right-based approach to management of fishing fleets, including enforcement of catch limits and effort limits. We used expert surveys to assess components of fisheries management systems such as research, management, enforcement, and socioeconomics in 28 major fishing countries that account for more than 80% of total catch globally [4]. Of the four stock status variables studied, the trend in fishing mortality may be the best predictor of future stock status. The level of transparency and stakeholder involvement in the management process, as well as the absence of capacity-enhancing subsidies, were found to be positively connected to fishing pressure trends [5]. This finding backs up previous research by demonstrating that increasing stakeholder engagement within governance frameworks can improve sustainable harvesting results for targeted species. The observed differences between studies are attributed, in part, to the variety of factors considered in each overall assessment. Our survey criteria focused primarily on target species, whereas EBFM criteria focused on ecosystem-level values, structure, function, and change [6]. Some criteria (fishery management plan, key habitat protection, community involvement) were investigated in both studies, but others were only examined in one or the other depending on overall focus [7]. Some of our requirements fall into other categories [8]. Three management variables were highly relevant in evaluating whether stock size and fishing mortality are now in or progressing toward ideal states: the breadth of stock assessments, the strength of fishing pressure limitations, and the breadth of enforcement programmes [9]. These findings support the premise that science-based catch or effort restrictions are crucial to successful fisheries management, and if monetary investment is used to control fishing pressure rather than increase fisheries capacity, it will help to achieve management objectives. Countries with less effective management systems today have the greatest opportunity to enhance long-term stock status outcomes and should be the focus of global efforts to improve fisheries management [10].

Conclusion

Climate change will have a wide range of effects on maritime ecosystems and resources. Previous forecasts that climate change could diminish world fisheries earnings by up to $10 billion per year compared to today drew a lot of attention. Taking human responses into consideration, on the other hand, changes our perspective on climate change and the world's waters. We show that the future of global fisheries could be more lucrative than today, but only if management reforms addressing present mismanagement and looming climate change issues are implemented across a wide range of fisheries in the near future. This is true internationally as well as for over half of the individual equities examined. These findings show that climate change will force global fisheries to a critical juncture in the coming decades. Either we respond to the issues proactively with effective management, or we risk undoing the tremendous gains accomplished in some countries and further decimating fisheries in nations that have not yet implemented strong fishery reforms.

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